RipePen.com

 

            RipeFruitGauge.com

 

Cantaloupe   

Pears  

Melons   

Peaches  

Pineapple 

Avocado

Mango

Check Avocado ripeness with the Ripe Pen


     The Ripe Pen is an amazing little device that helps to determine if fruit is ripe and ready to eat.  Traditional methods of smelling and feeling and watching for the right color are great methods, but to me they are to subjective. They are not accurate enough, especially with hard skin fruit like cantaloupe and avocado


Using the Ripe Pen provides a consistent, measurable method of confirming that fruit is ready to eat.  A spring loaded probe indicates texture of the fruit, by the degree of spring-back after injection.


The Ripe Pen is minimally invasive so that the fruit can continue to ripen.

 

How often do we cut open an unripe or over-ripe cantaloupe, avacado, peach or pear and then throw it out ?   The world wide amount of food that is wasted every year is close to a third of what is produced.

 

The Ripe Pen was invented in an attempt to reduce food waste, get more value from groceries and taste fruit the way it should taste.  

 

The following are bits of advice gathered from the internet on when avocado is ripe.  Some I agee with and some I do not. There are quite a few opinions out there. The most reliable and easiest way for me is using the Ripe Pen.

Hugh Johnson

Avocados

from yumsugar.com

If you purchase avocados, you probably know the proper technique for checking for ripeness. Give the flesh a soft squeeze and it should yield to moderate pressure. However, sometimes a soft avocado is actually bruised. Since there's nothing more disappointing than slicing into a browned avocado, I've got another way of testing for ripeness. Flick the small brown stem off the top of the avocado. If it comes off easily and you can see green underneath it, the avocado is ripe! If the stem doesn't come off or if you see brown, the avocado is not ripe.

from about.com

Question: How Can I Tell When an Avocado Fruit Is Ripe?
I am anxious for my baby to try an avocado fruit, but I don't know how to pick one from the grocery store. How can I tell if it is ripe?
Answer:

Avocado is a great choice for baby. Sadly neglected, avocado as a first food for baby is a nutritious and developmentally appropriate for babies beginning solids. If you are unfamiliar with selecting a good avocado, rest assured it's a fairly simple selection process.

Selecting Ripe Avocado Fruit

If you want to purchase your avocado ripe and ready to eat, look for one that has a bumpy skin in a dark green shade. When you gently squeeze the avocado, it should be firm but give just a little under the pressure. Rock hard avocados are not yet ripe, and ones that feel soft are over ripe.

When you prepare the avocado for your baby, you'll notice that when you cut the ripe avocado in half the inside flesh is green that goes to a butter yellow toward the pit. This is a good indication that you've selected a perfect avocado.

Ripen Avocados in a Brown Paper Bag

If you'd rather allow your avocados ripen at home, you can hasten the process by placing them in a brown paper bag - just don't place them in the refrigerator when they are not ripe. Check regularly for ripeness. It's really that simple.

com

from avocado.org

Selecting Fresh Fruit

  • When selecting an avocado, look for the Fresh California Avocado Brand, your assurance that the fruit was grown under the best conditions possible.
  • The best way to tell if a California Avocado is ready for immediate use is to gently squeeze the fruit in the palm of your hand. Ripe, ready-to-eat fruit will be firm yet will yield to gentle pressure.
  • Color alone may not tell the whole story. The Hass avocado will turn dark green or black as it ripens, but other varieties retain their light-green skin even when ripe.
  • If you plan to serve the fruit in a few days, stock up on hard, unripened fruit.
  • Avoid fruit with dark blemishes on the skin or over soft fruit.

Ripening a California Avocado

  • To ripen a California Avocado, place the fruit in a plain brown paper bag and store at room temperature 65-75° until ready to eat (usually two to five days).
  • Including an apple or banana in the bag accelerates the process because these fruits give off ethylene gas, a ripening reagent.
  • Soft ripe fruit can be refrigerated until it is eaten, but not for more than two or three days.
  • The California Avocado Commission does not recommend using a microwave to accelerate the ripening process.

Handling California Avocados

As with any food preparation, begin by washing your hands in hot, soapy water and dry them with a clean paper towel. To avoid cross-contamination from raw meat, poultry or eggs, always disinfect your cutting surfaces and utensils. Thoroughly wash the fruit before you slice it.


Peeling a California Avocado

Use this simple three-step process:

  1. Start with a ripe avocado and cut it lengthwise around the seed. Rotate the halves to separate.
  2. Remove the seed by sliding the tip of a spoon gently underneath and lifting out. The other common seed-extraction method - striking the seed with a knife and twisting - requires some skill and is not recommended.
  3. Peel the fruit by placing the cut side down and removing the skin with a knife or your fingers, starting at the small end. Or simply scoop out the avocado meat with a spoon. Be sure to sprinkle all cut surfaces with lemon or lime juice or white vinegar to prevent discoloration.

from yahoo answers

 

When do I cut an avocado?

 

Various varieties of avocado come from California, but if you have the Hass type, here's a visual guide:
Fuertes, etc, don't turn really dark Btw, if you can't eat an avocado once it gives to gentle pressure, put it in the frig and you can keep it for quite awhile before cutting open. You can even keep a cut half in good shape refrigerating and also pressing a sheet of plastic wrap directly on the surface as well as possible.
  • 2 months ago
  • Answerer 2

    When it's barely soft

    Source(s):

    experience
    • 2 months ago
  • Answerer 3

    take em and warsh em down haveing bers
    • 2 months ago
  • Answerer 4

    Make sure they are slightly squishy. Or you could cut one slightly, look inside, then shut and wrap tightly in a plastic bag if it doesn't look ripe.
    • 2 months ago
  • Answerer 5

    They are ready to eat when they "give" a little to gentle finger pressure. It make a day or 3 or 4 for them to finish ripening.
  • Answerer 6

    when there soft
    • 2 months ago
  • Answerer 7

    i learned a great trick.. press on your forehead- if an avocado feels like that then it's not ripe.
    press on your check-if an avocado feels like that then it's too old
    now press on the tip of your nose- if an avocado feels like that it is ripe!!!

    eventually you'll get the hang of what kind of ripeness you prefer best
  • from whfoods.com


    The best way to ripen avocados

    A friend of mine once planted an avocado tree and as the avocados would grow to full size, he would let them sit on the tree, waiting and waiting for them to get soft before harvesting them. But they never did get soft. The lesson: avocados do not ripen on the tree, but only after they have been harvested. This is the reason that they are often still hard at the market, which is not a sign of an inferior fruit but of one that still needs some time to undergo full ripening, a process which is simple to do at home. In fact, unless you are going to be serving the avocado immediately after purchasing, it is better to buy one that is still hard so that you can control the ripening process and therefore the point at which it will be perfect for consumption.

    How do you know when avocados are ripe?

    Although most avocados you find at the store are hard, some stores carry ripe, ready-to-eat avocadoes for their customers. An avocado is ripe when its skin turns from green to a dark brown-green color and "gives" slightly when it is gently squeezed. You can select the best, ripe and ready-to-eat avocado by looking for one that is slightly soft, without dark sunken spots or cracks. Obviously, these signs apply not only to avocados that are ripe in the store, but to those at home, giving you signs as to when your fruit has reached the perfect time to be eaten.

    Be sure not to purchase avocados that rattle when you shake them. This means the pit is pulled away from the flesh and it is overripe.

    How to Store Avocadoes After You Bring Them Home

    Never refrigerate unripened (hard) avocados because they will not ripen in cold temperatures.

    Unripened (hard) avocados are best stored in a cool dark place until they have ripened.

    If Your Avocados are Not Ripe, Here's How to Ripen Them

    Place unripe avocados in a brown paper bag to ripen. This traps the ethylene gas they produce and helps them to ripen. A firm avocado placed in a paper bag will ripen at room temperature in about three to six days. As the fruit ripens, the skin color will darken.

    How to Speed Up the Ripening of Your Avocados

    Add a tomato, apple or banana to a paper bag in which you have placed an avocado. This will produce more ethylene gas and speed up the ripening process. It will usually only take one to three days to ripen.

    When to refrigerate avocados

    Only refrigerate ripe avocados. Avocados will keep for up to 5 days when refrigerated but leaving them too long in the refrigerator will cause them to lose their flavor and begin to turn dark in color. Avoid slicing avocados before refrigerating as they will turn brown after they are cut.

    Handle with Care

    If you need to store an avocado that has been cut, wrap it tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

    Some of the most common varieties include:

    Haas: Grown in California, this variety makes up over 75% of the US avocado crop. Their edible yellow-green flesh has the consistency of butter, and a subtle, nutty flavor. They are about the size of a pear and have pebbly brown-black skin when ripe.

    Fuerte: These Florida-grown avocados are larger than the Haas variety, having a more defined pear-like shape and smooth, bright green skin. Their flesh is more watery and fibrous, and they contain half the fat and fewer calories than Haas avocados.

    Zutano and Bacon: These varieties have similar characteristics to the Fuerte, but they are less commonly available.

    Cocktail Avocado: Weighing a modest one to two ounces, these small, pitless avocados are harder to find but well worth the search.

    yahooanswers.com

    Best Answer - Chosen by Asker

    Now is a good time to buy avacado's; your local grocery should start stocking more of them now. Avacado's should be slightly firm with some give. If they are hard, they are not ripe yet but can sit on your counter for a few days until they're ready. Squishy avacados are probably brown.

    The black splotchy/dark green avacados are most common and they are normally that color. The light green variety is native to Florida and are larger.

    from avocadocentral.com

    Pick & Buy Hass Avocados

    How to Pick Ripe Avocados, How to Select the Best Avocado, Buying Avocados Before an Event and How to Know When an Avocado is Ripe

    Unripe Avocados

    How to Know When a Hass Avocado is Ripe


    Did you know that Hass Avocados do not ripen on the tree? They ripen or "soften" after they have been harvested. Hass Avocados are unique from some of the other varieties of avocados because they can change from a dark-green color to a deep purplish almost black hue when ripe. Although skin color can help in the initial visual selection of Hass Avocados it is not always the best indicator for ripeness. Ripeness is ultimately determined by pressure, color can sometimes be misleading as avocado "softening" can occur at a varying rate, independent of the color.

    Avocados in a basket

    Here's how to pick the best Hass Avocados:

    Step 1 – Take a look at the chart below. When comparing a group of Hass Avocados, check the outside color of the skin of the avocados for any that are darker in color than the others. These may be riper than Hass Avocados with lighter skin. Check the outer skin of the avocado for any large indentations as this may be a sign that the fruit has been bruised.

    from 

    CASA Veneracion


    Avocados: how to tell when they are ripe and how to hasten ripening

    Speedy loves avocados. He splits the fruit open, scoops out and mash the flesh, adds powdered milk and he eats it that way. I don’t eat avocados unless they have been made into guacamole. Seriously. That’s why you don’t see recipes for avocado shake or avocado salad in my food blog. But give me a cup of guacamole and tortillas and I’ll finish them in no time.

    Now, I’m not a fan of store-bought guacamole. I like to make guacamole from scratch. It’s really very easy to make (get the recipe). The hardest part is making sure that the avocados are perfectly ripe but not overripe. Unripe avocados are hard as rock and can’t be quickly chopped nor mashed. And they aren’t creamy at all so you won’t get that creamy salsa texture.

    On the other hand, if the avocado is overripe, there will be visible root like patterns on the flesh and the flesh turns too mushy that, when mashed, it practically turns into gooey liquid.

    Avocados: how to tell when they are ripe and how to hasten ripening

    So, how can I tell if an avocado is perfectly ripe to make my guacamole?

    I don’t go by the color of the skin. Some avocados turn dark purple while still unripe; others remain green even when they reach the perfectly ripe stage. I go by touch of hand. I lightly squeeze the unopened avocado. If the flesh yields lightly, it is almost ripe. If it does not, it is unripe. If it feels soft, it is perfectly ripe. If it feels too soft, it is overripe.

    In fruits stalls and groceries, perfectly ripe avocado is rarely sold. That’s because the shelf life is short and, a day later, the avocado will be overripe and can no longer be sold. Ergo, most avocados are sold while still unripe. The natural ripening process can take several days. What if you’re already itching for homemade guacamole? Here’s a trick I read on the web but still haven’t tried.

    If Your Avocados are Not Ripe, Here’s How to Ripen Them

    Place unripe avocados in a brown paper bag to ripen. This traps the ethylene gas they produce and helps them to ripen. A firm avocado placed in a paper bag will ripen at room temperature in about three to six days. As the fruit ripens, the skin color will darken.

    How to Speed Up the Ripening of Your Avocados

    Add a tomato, apple or banana to a paper bag in which you have placed an avocado. This will produce more ethylene gas and speed up the ripening process. It will usually only take one to three days to ripen.

    from whfoods.com

    The best way to ripen avocados

    A friend of mine once planted an avocado tree and as the avocados would grow to full size, he would let them sit on the tree, waiting and waiting for them to get soft before harvesting them. But they never did get soft. The lesson: avocados do not ripen on the tree, but only after they have been harvested. This is the reason that they are often still hard at the market, which is not a sign of an inferior fruit but of one that still needs some time to undergo full ripening, a process which is simple to do at home. In fact, unless you are going to be serving the avocado immediately after purchasing, it is better to buy one that is still hard so that you can control the ripening process and therefore the point at which it will be perfect for consumption.

    How do you know when avocados are ripe?

    Although most avocados you find at the store are hard, some stores carry ripe, ready-to-eat avocadoes for their customers. An avocado is ripe when its skin turns from green to a dark brown-green color and "gives" slightly when it is gently squeezed. You can select the best, ripe and ready-to-eat avocado by looking for one that is slightly soft, without dark sunken spots or cracks. Obviously, these signs apply not only to avocados that are ripe in the store, but to those at home, giving you signs as to when your fruit has reached the perfect time to be eaten.

    Be sure not to purchase avocados that rattle when you shake them. This means the pit is pulled away from the flesh and it is overripe.

    How to Store Avocadoes After You Bring Them Home

    Never refrigerate unripened (hard) avocados because they will not ripen in cold temperatures.

    Unripened (hard) avocados are best stored in a cool dark place until they have ripened.

    If Your Avocados are Not Ripe, Here's How to Ripen Them

    Place unripe avocados in a brown paper bag to ripen. This traps the ethylene gas they produce and helps them to ripen. A firm avocado placed in a paper bag will ripen at room temperature in about three to six days. As the fruit ripens, the skin color will darken.

    How to Speed Up the Ripening of Your Avocados

    Add a tomato, apple or banana to a paper bag in which you have placed an avocado. This will produce more ethylene gas and speed up the ripening process. It will usually only take one to three days to ripen.

    When to refrigerate avocados

    Only refrigerate ripe avocados. Avocados will keep for up to 5 days when refrigerated but leaving them too long in the refrigerator will cause them to lose their flavor and begin to turn dark in color. Avoid slicing avocados before refrigerating as they will turn brown after they are cut.

    Handle with Care

    If you need to store an avocado that has been cut, wrap it tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

    Some of the most common varieties include:

    Haas: Grown in California, this variety makes up over 75% of the US avocado crop. Their edible yellow-green flesh has the consistency of butter, and a subtle, nutty flavor. They are about the size of a pear and have pebbly brown-black skin when ripe.

    Fuerte: These Florida-grown avocados are larger than the Haas variety, having a more defined pear-like shape and smooth, bright green skin. Their flesh is more watery and fibrous, and they contain half the fat and fewer calories than Haas avocados.

    Zutano and Bacon: These varieties have similar characteristics to the Fuerte, but they are less commonly available.

    Cocktail Avocado: Weighing a modest one to two ounces, these small, pitless avocados are harder to find but well worth the search.



    from whfoods.com
    AvocadosAvocados

    The avocado is colloquially known as the Alligator Pear, reflecting its shape and the leather-like appearance of its skin. Avocado is derived from the Aztec word "ahuacatl". Avocados are the fruit from Persea americana, a tall evergreen tree that can grow up to 65 feet in height. Avocados vary in weight from 8 ounces to 3 pounds depending upon the variety.

    What's New and Beneficial about Avocados

    • Consider adding avocado to salads, and not only on account of taste! Recent research has shown that absorption of two key carotenoid antioxidants—lycopene and beta-carotene—increases significantly when fresh avocado (or avocado oil) is added to an otherwise avocado-free salad. One cup of fresh avocado (150 grams) added to a salad of romaine lettuce, spinach, and carrots increased absorption of carotenoids from this salad between 200-400%. This research result makes perfect sense to us because carotenoids are fat-soluble and would be provided with the fat they need for absorption from the addition of avocado. Avocado oil added to a salad accomplished this same result. Interestingly, both avocado oil and fresh avocado added to salsa increased carotenoid absorption from the salsa as well. That's even more reason for you to try our 15-Minute Halibut with Avocado Salsaa great-tasting recipe that can help optimize your carotenoid health benefits.
    • The method you use to peel an avocado can make a difference to your health. Research has shown that the greatest concentration of carotenoids in avocado occurs in the dark green flesh that lies just beneath the skin. You don't want to slice into that dark green portion any more than necessary when you are peeling an avocado. For this reason, the best method is what the California Avocado Commission has called the "nick and peel" method. In this method, you actually end up peeling the avocado with your hands in the same way that you would peel a banana. The first step in the nick-and-peel method is to cut into the avocado lengthwise, producing two long avocado halves that are still connected in the middle by the seed. Next you take hold of both halves and twist them in opposite directions until they naturally separate. At this point, remove the seed and cut each of the halves lengthwise to produce long quartered sections of the avocado. You can use your thumb and index finger to grip the edge of the skin on each quarter and peel it off, just as you would do with a banana skin. The final result is a peeled avocado that contains most of that dark green outermost flesh so rich in carotenoid antioxidants!
    • We tend to think about carotenoids as most concentrated in bright orange or red vegetables like carrots or tomatoes. While these vegetables are fantastic sources of carotenoids, avocado—despite its dark green skin and largely greenish inner pulp—is now known to contain a spectacular array of carotenoids. Researchers believe that avocado's amazing carotenoid diversity is a key factor in the anti-inflammatory properties of this vegetable. The list of carotenoids found in avocado include well-known carotenoids like beta-carotene, alpha-carotene and lutein, but also many lesser known carotenoids including neochrome, neoxanthin, chrysanthemaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin, and violaxanthin.
    • Avocado has sometimes received a "bad rap" as a vegetable too high in fat. While it is true that avocado is a high-fat food (about 85% of its calories come from fat), the fat contained in avocado is unusual and provides research-based health benefits. The unusual nature of avocado fat is threefold. First are the phytosterols that account for a major portion of avocado fats. These phytosterols include beta-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol and they are key supporters of our inflammatory system that help keep inflammation under control. The anti-inflammatory benefits of these avocado fats are particularly well-documented with problems involving arthritis. Second are avocado's polyhydroxylated fatty alcohols (PFAs). PFAs are widely present in ocean plants but fairly unique among land plants—making the avocado tree (and its fruit) unusual in this regard. Like the avocado's phytosterols, its PFAs also provide us with anti-inflammatory benefits. Third is the unusually high amount of a fatty acid called oleic acid in avocado. Over half of the total fat in avocado is provided in the form of oleic acid—a situation very similar to the fat composition of olives and olive oil. Oleic acid helps our digestive tract form transport molecules for fat that can increase our absorption of fat-soluble nutrients like carotenoids. As a monounsaturated fatty acid, it has also been shown to help lower our risk of heart disease. So don't be fooled by avocado's bad rap as a high-fat food. Like other high-fat plant foods (for example, walnuts and flaxseeds), avocado can provide us with unique health benefits precisely because of its unusual fat composition.


    Selecting Fresh Fruit

    • When selecting an avocado, look for the Fresh California Avocado Brand, your assurance that the fruit was grown under the best conditions possible.
    • The best way to tell if a California Avocado is ready for immediate use is to gently squeeze the fruit in the palm of your hand. Ripe, ready-to-eat fruit will be firm yet will yield to gentle pressure.
    • Color alone may not tell the whole story. The Hass avocado will turn dark green or black as it ripens, but other varieties retain their light-green skin even when ripe.
    • If you plan to serve the fruit in a few days, stock up on hard, unripened fruit.
    • Avoid fruit with dark blemishes on the skin or over soft fruit.

     

    Ripening a California Avocado

    • To ripen a California Avocado, place the fruit in a plain brown paper bag and store at room temperature 65-75° until ready to eat (usually two to five days).
    • Including an apple or banana in the bag accelerates the process because these fruits give off ethylene gas, a ripening reagent.
    • Soft ripe fruit can be refrigerated until it is eaten, but not for more than two or three days.
    • The California Avocado Commission does not recommend using a microwave to accelerate the ripening process.

     

    Handling California Avocados

    As with any food preparation, begin by washing your hands in hot, soapy water and dry them with a clean paper towel. To avoid cross-contamination from raw meat, poultry or eggs, always disinfect your cutting surfaces and utensils. Thoroughly wash the fruit before you slice it.

     

    Peeling a California Avocado

    Use this simple three-step process:

    1. Start with a ripe avocado and cut it lengthwise around the seed. Rotate the halves to separate.
    2. Remove the seed by sliding the tip of a spoon gently underneath and lifting out. The other common seed-extraction method - striking the seed with a knife and twisting - requires some skill and is not recommended.
    3. Peel the fruit by placing the cut side down and removing the skin with a knife or your fingers, starting at the small end. Or simply scoop out the avocado meat with a spoon. Be sure to sprinkle all cut surfaces with lemon or lime juice or white vinegar to prevent discoloration.

    Or, watch as Chef Trey Foshee demonstrates his favorite way to cut and peel a California Avocado:

    Storing or Freezing California Avocados

    Ripe fruit can be stored in the refrigerator uncut for two to three days. To store cut fruit, sprinkle it with lemon or lime juice or white vinegar and place in an air-tight container in your refrigerator. If refrigerated guacamole turns brown during storage, discard the top layer.

    When you have an abundance of fresh avocados, consider freezing them. Pureed avocados freeze very well and can be used in salads, sandwiches and dips. See the below instructions for how to freeze avocado:

    • Wash, seed and peel the fruit as described above.
    • Puree the flesh, adding one tablespoon of lemon juice for each two pureed avocados. Pack the puree into an air-tight container, leaving 1 inch of headspace.
    • Seal and label the containers.
    • Freeze and use within four to five months.

    from superfoodsrx.com

    How to Buy and Eat an Avocado

    PrintE-mail
    An unripe avocado will have none of the delicious creaminess of a ripe one. When shopping for avocados, select fruit that is unblemished, without cracks or dark sunken spots. A ripe avocado will yield slightly to the touch when pressed, and this slight softness indicates it's ready to eat. It's often difficult to find a ripe avocado in the store, but it will ripen at home in a few days in a paper bag or on the kitchen counter. Plan in advance so you'll have ripe avocados when you need them. Do not refrigerate avocados.

    Guacamole is a favorite use for avocado and I've included a great "guac" recipe. There are many variations on this basic recipe, the simplest probably being mashing a ripe avocado with a roughly equal amount of prepared salsa.

    My favorite ways to eat avocados are:

    • Spread on toasted whole-grain bread and topped with salsa
    • As a garnish for turkey tacos



    When is fruit ripe?
    Use the Ripe Pen, or Ripe Fruit Gauge to determine when is fruit ripe and ready to eat.
    The Ripe Pen works well on many fruits but specifically cantaloupe, 
    avocado, pineapple, mango, kiwi, pears, peaches and melon